Environment
Conservation Journal

"An International Journal Devoted to Conservation of Environment"

(A PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)

ISSN: 2278-5124 (Online) :: ISSN: 0972-3099 (Print)

Environment
Conservation Journal

"An International Journal Devoted to Conservation of Environment"

(A PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)

ISSN: 2278-5124 (Online) :: ISSN: 0972-3099 (Print)

Environment
Conservation Journal

"An International Journal Devoted to Conservation of Environment"

(A PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)

ISSN: 2278-5124 (Online) :: ISSN: 0972-3099 (Print)

Environment
Conservation Journal

"An International Journal Devoted to Conservation of Environment"

(A PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)

ISSN: 2278-5124 (Online) :: ISSN: 0972-3099 (Print)

Environment
Conservation Journal

"An International Journal Devoted to Conservation of Environment"

(A PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)

ISSN: 2278-5124 (Online) :: ISSN: 0972-3099 (Print)

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Phytorestoration in the debris dumping sites of a hydroelectric power project: A case study from Srinagar (Garhwal), Western Himalaya, India

 Dinesh Singh Rawat 

Central National Herbarium, Botanical Survey of India
Howrah West Bengal, India
Radha Ballabha, Surbhi Suri, J. K. Tiwari,  P. Tiwari
Department of Botany and Microbiology, Hemvati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University Srinagar (Garhwal) – 246174, Uttarakhand, India

Abstract

The plant propagules migrate into denuded or conditionally created habitats by variety of means and grow, capable species establishes their population successfully and rest abolish. The present study was aimed to identify potential species in such habitats by evaluating naturalized community in conditionally crated habitats i.e. debris dumping sites of a hydroelectric power project in Western Himalayas, India for phytoretoration (eco-restoration) purpose. The data on phytosociological attributes of herbaceous community was collected from both debris dumping area (D) and undumped natural area (N) in the fringe, by quadrat method (1 x 1 m dimension). A total of 54 species from debris dumping sites and 128 species from undumped natural area (N) are recorded in this study. The invasive alien species predominates at dumping sites which covered 37% of the species richness, 50.99% of density, 76.67% of basal cover and 63.15% of dominance (IVI). Thus, invasive species are opportunistic in the process of phytorestoration in degraded habitats, which may not be beneficial for the better functioning of ecosystem but some of them can be considered as potential preliminary soil binder at such cases (dumping area). The development agencies must have an eco-restoration plan for such dumping zones which magnetized the encroachments of invasive alien species and play a pivotal role in degrading the natural ecosystem.

Dumping site, Eco-restoration, Hydroelectric power project (HEP), Invasive species, Soil binder

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Rawat, D. S., Ballabha, R., Suri, S., Tiwari, J. K., & Tiwari, P. (2017). Phytorestoration in the debris dumping sites of a hydroelectric power project: A case study from Srinagar (Garhwal), Western Himalaya, India. Environment Conservation Journal18(3), 189-197.

:https://doi.org/10.36953/ECJ.2017.18325

Received: 29.05.2017

Revised: 30.07.2017

Accepted: 02.08.2017

First Online: 21.12. 2017

:https://doi.org/10.36953/ECJ.2017.18325

MANUSCRIPT STATISTICS

Publisher Name:  Action for Sustainable Efficacious Development and Awareness (ASEA)

Print : 0972-3099

Online :2278-5124